How Combs on Dog Clippers Work

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How do a clipper comb of a dog work? This is a mystery to many who are new to grooming or have decided to take on the task themselves. However, these are handy tools can be invaluable to the learning process.

Dog clippers have optional attachments which look and function just like a comb. But what do they do? Would not it just be easier to brush or comb out your dog before grooming? Keep on reading to find the answers.

A Safety Tool

These are not just about combing out your dog’s hair during grooming. Most these are often seen as safety tools that allow new groomers to become more familiar with: clippers, blades, and their pup.

Combs-on-Dog-Clippers

While grooming can leave you to feel anxious at first these combs, sometimes they are called clipper guards can put your mind at ease. As a safety tool, it can allow you to learn how to groom at home without a great decrease in the risk of putting your pup in any kind of discomfort.

Dog clipper combs are made to establish a safer method of grooming that allows groomers to work faster and keep the haircut even. It is one tool that serves many uses but has one purpose.

Purpose and What They Do It For Pup

Dog clipper combs or guards work to create a barrier between the dog’s skin and the naked blade. A naked blade can grab your pup’s skin. Getting a sharp cut or having skin grabbed is not the experience you want your pup to have during grooming.

There are a few variations on clipper combs, and how dog clipper combs work. The most common is a clip-on option that is plastic. You do not have to worry about a comb getting hot or cutting your pet with this type.

Stainless steel snap or slide on options can let you accidentally give your pet a sharp poke. We don’t’ recommend these for beginners. However, someone with a little experience looking to invest in blades that will last a little longer should check these out.

Clipping a Dog

 

What Clipper Combs Will Not Do

These combs are not intended to fight through matted hair or fur. If you dogs have thick fur we suggest getting very comfortable with working using a naked blade.

However, in lower clipper sizes, you can use these guards over sensitive areas. Also, these guards aren’t for guiding your trimming patterns. Although they help your comfort they can be more difficult to learn to style with. As they add bulk but not weight onto your clippers it becomes a trick of balancing angular cuts with functionality.

Speaking of functionality, clipper combs also don’t serve as a sanitation barrier. Many people who are new to grooming don’t feel comfortable with taking on the sensitive genital areas of their pup. Keep some gloves on but most of all keep in mind the needs of your pet.

While clipper combs don’t serve as a sanitary barrier, they can be used for safety. Just be sure to wash them and use smaller clipper sizes to keep this area shorter.

Clipper combs also aren’t able to extend the cut off of your clippers. Definitely, don’t use a smaller clipper size because you’re using a clipper comb. This is a trick of the eye! When you’re using clipper combs because they are pulling through your dog’s fur it looks like there is more fur being pushed around.

When to Use Clipper Combs

Usually, a blade #10 or lower is the time to snap on a comb. This prevents too much hair from being pushed around as you are aiming to keep a shorting cut regardless. Additionally, there is a lot more flexibility in combs on smaller clipper sizes. Build your comfort with clipper blades that work closer to your pup’s skin.

Final Thought

It is not difficult to know how a clipper comb of a dog work as it is a normal and safety tool for most of the pet owners. However, you should find out what a clipper comb will do and will not to take into account on your purchasing.

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Gail Ramirez

Gail Ramirez

Gail is an aspiring blogger, pet lover and Greys Anatomy, addict. Gail shares her experience on Pet Fashion Week as she studies to become a qualified vet.